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[untitled]

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00:30:00

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San Francisco 24, Us 11, Macon 5, U.s. Navy 4, The City 4, Pacific 3, Beeman 3, Shannon 3, Sam 2, Ireland 2, Liberations 1, Gerald Beeman 1, George Scholtz 1, Sawyer 1, Pringle 1, Hanger 1, Lewis Loeven 1, Mike Myers 1, Feinstein 1, Cardinals Fan 1,
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  SFGTV2    [untitled]  

    November 30, 2012
    12:30 - 1:00am PST  

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the city. and started to do this and started to think there must be a list out there. there must be a list of every park in san francisco. i would find it in wikipedia. we stumbled into the sf data website and started looking. it was unbelievable, actually. so, some of the data sets we really needed were already there in very, very good format. and random things that i would never think of like movie set locations in the city of san francisco or every piece of civic art that was there, just really interesting things all with, you know, latitude-longitude, tags and information about them. it was really interesting. and then in my first meeting, in our first meeting with the innovation group, the city i heard of 10 other things that i clearly should have been using and didn't even know existed, literally within the first 15 minutes of the meeting. ss things like street safety, sidewalk safety scores and quality scores so we could wrap people around places. * route people around places.
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really unbelievable. we availed ourselves of resources going forward. we had the same -- like any data set, you find great things about it. then there's missing values or is thisxtion that got auto populated. we fixed a lot of things. we fixed a lot of gps coordinates. we would love the ability to post that back up * . even if you're not crowd sourcing new things, you can definitely crowd source quality of a data set that way. >> yeah, it's been a really great experience working with 100 plus and motion loft. just to respond, i think that this is a whole new opportunity actually what you're talking about. in addition to reaching out to the private sector to generate more data sets as you just mentioned, there's also the opportunity to have better data
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sets from the work that you've done, scrubbing them and harmonizing them. i think there is also this really great opportunity to generate whole new types of data sets like motion loft is doing. and i think that this is going to present something kind of back to the city, showing where some of our gaps are and hopefully filling in some of those gaps with those data sets. so, i think that there is something about having more city data sets, existing data sets as well as creating new types of data. this is really exciting for us. >> we're going to tell a quick story on how private data can stimulate civic innovation. this summer in singapore, we had about 30 data sets opened p. up. one data set was about a million or so records of taxis all over town. typically taxi data stuff, it's hard to get, private companies, they don't want to open it up competitively. one taxi company at the last
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minute opened up, motion loft made it efficient to see what would happen. because they contributed to the stuff, we had five separate teams working on could we do collaborative consumption of sharing taxis, build a dash panel for companies to know where to go. had i hatch i had been working on a model to see how much overlap there was. they sent us to tokyo to work on that. so, this one set, a million records of where the taxis were not only led to a lot of innovation, but people realized 15% of all taxi routes kind of where people went, about 15% of that was all overlapped. so, a city that never really thought about collaborative consumption or sharing suddenly is looking at that. parking data was opened up similarly about a million records of where people weren't parking and within a couple of days predictive analytic app was written. go to a parking reservation thing. the carrier local phone company released pairs of where people were all over town.
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a lot of privacy issues. we wrote a contract around that. all of that led to a huge amount of innovation and new forms of thinking. and even as i look at what goes on with teams working in san francisco stuff, the minute for example i saw the esri data that has tons of economics and social behavior behind t i realized sometimes you come together and work on something, and lacking that stuff you make assumptions, you make things up. you don't have a rich set of data. the fact there is a place to turn either because it's free or you can go pay for it, but it's kind of normalized and available i think just speeds things up, reduces redundancy and that's going to be the thing that leads it a real burst of innovation and value both financial value for developers, but also civic value for where we live and clearly we're at the very beginning of that. and i think san francisco has been pushing ahead and that's why it's exciting. >> i'm going to give you a chance to talk about his experience in a second. first i'll open it up for questions from the audience in just a second. think of anything you want to ask our many panelists up here.
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all san franciscans. i'll give the panel to ask each other questions if they want. talk about your experiences working with san francisco. >> sawyer, i could barely here you. >> sure, could you talk a little what your experience is like working with san francisco and, you know, other things that you'd like to see that have become available in start-ups that aren't already. * sorry >> so, we started navigating the city of san francisco or working with the city of san francisco close to 2-1/2 years ago after our initial concept. we realized about two years ago we discovered the innovation office. we discovered sf data sets, and we were absolutely delighted to have the resources available to us through these offices. and they really were the driving factor behind our development moving forward. obviously they weren't exactly where we needed them to be at that time, and we had worked
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with multiple departments now on cleaning up the data sets obviously. and then putting that back out there. one of our biggest pin points or struggles has been with the legislation and the old models of the [inaudible] the regulations and laws which are being slowly worked on through the legal departments and the san francisco's legal department. but essentially we found the experience through innovation office has been driving the initiatives through and helping us develop and the data sets have bon become cleaner. they have become easier for us to use and the process has become a lot more efficient. >> school. -- cool. i was told if you have a question you should line up at that microphone right there. if you're coming up -- no, he did youant [speaker not
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understood]. >> i don't have a question. i wanted to comment on this. i think something else is really unique and maybe one of the untold stories or not told so much stories about the impact of open data is really the companies that are being formed. and as you mentioned earlier, they're a sustainable company and this is being powered by open data and motion loft is figuring out how they can share the asset that sort of your business model is built on. so, i think that this is presenting a whole new type of question for sort of apps built with government data or public data. >> i guess i'll jump in once here, too, while people are stepping up. we've been doing this for awhile now. one thing we've learned in this innovation space, people matter. like you can build technology you want, platform you want, that's great. it's the people who are doing it that matter and they're going to get stuff done. this has some of the best
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people, shannon and jay are doing t. they've been doing it awhile so they know what they're doing. it's great. last year i was building this adopted tree app and i found it on the data portal. it had like some weird geo data like it was in some form i couldn't use. i just dropped jay a note and like within 24 hours i got the data fixed and it was perfect. so, it's those kind of relationships that matter and having the right people in place. so, i think the chief data officer, these guys will end up joining a rock star team. >> not a question, but just a comment to say thanks to the city's innovation office. we're a small company from ireland called building i. we take permit data from cities and show it to anyone who wants to see it. we started off in ireland, discovered the san francisco data and came over here and now we've got an office up and running here with san francisco data. so, it's great to be able to do that. just one note of caution of how do you prevent kind of
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third-party data integrators from owning that data. i think jay was talking about it earlier on. it's just a note of caution for you guys. >> how do we prevent vendors from holding the data? >> yes. >> we're still working on this piece with our legal department. we're looking to do and this is very exploratory right now, really looking at the contracting process itself and how we can use that as a mechanism. basically we want to do business with you if you're willing to share your data. as jay mentioned we don't want to be held hostage. we don't want our data to be held hostage to the companies. as we figure this out, we'll continue going about it and providing updates. yeah, i think that there's actually a lot of companies out there that are being powered right now with our open data program. so, if there's any that aren't represented here today, please let us know. we would love to feature you. because this is the other story that i was talking about.
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open data is demonstrating economic growth and job creation. so, yes, it's about transparency, yes, it's about openness, but it's also about creating jobs and this is a really exciting piece of the story. >> we have another question. >> thanks, everybody, great panel, great things going on. i have a question around strategies that you guys are facing to monetize somehow this data. of course, having companies that create applications and then they sell these somehow is fantastic. but is government thinking about ways in which they can directly monetize these data sets? >> can i say one quick thing first? i remember we were at the white house innovation panel and there was this exact conversation came up because we are looking to monetize everything we do. and the city is also looking to monetize this and make revenue. one of the biggest conversation pieces that came out of the talk and some of the questions from the crowd was opening up
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apis for transactions, permitting, reservations and those type of things, which would be an incredible influx of private industry working with governments and also providing incredible efficiency for the public to be able to make these transactions. i'll probably say that ian might want to talk more on this, but that would be something that would be highly encouraged from the private sector and from my company specifically. >> that's a great point. and i'll say the short answer to your question is the federal government is trying to not charge for this data. the way we did was with tax dollars. you already paid for it, we're trying to give it back to you. and, so, we take a wholesale retail. we want to be the providers of the data as a fuel, but fuel, gasoline is useless to get you from point a to point b unless you consume that ultimately drives value to the american economy. our customer, i can completely agree with what shannon said in terms of our business objective, so to speak, is to
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empower entrepreneurs and innovators, to create jobs. that's a metric of success, not revenue generated per data set or some other per ifervance metric. the other piece of that looking back to the example of weather and gps, my monetization, is that together they contribute $100 billion to the american economy last year. last year alone from just those two data liberations. so, that is the way in which we are approaching from a strategy perspective, the ultimate impact to our customers. >> one super quick. one thing the city of san francisco or big cities or federal, right, the other smaller cities, smaller cities have smaller budgets. having a structure to support all this open data takes a lot of money. so, when these small cities are thinking about this, they should think about a way of somehow equalizing because they are putting into having these open data team, right?
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so, what does make sense? this is kind of an open question to get your point of view. >> do you want to take that, shannon? >> i think that there is actually quite ah few examples. we can probably talk to this more with smaller cities that are making open data efforts. but what i would say is that it's proven more than the value of the investment. the return that we've gotten just by opening up the data has actually given back more. so, that would be my short answer to it, but i think you probably have more experience working directly with some of the cities. >> so, i grew up in a small city so i care about small cities a lot, 15,000 people, southern illinois. i'm a card nastionv fan. -- cardinals fan. i should say that. the city of santa cruz, for instance, it's a smaller city. they're a leader in open data. they've been doing this for a long time. the working with the city of
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make on, georgia, they're doing it as well. * macon. the smaller cities are taking advantage of easily reusable solution thextion, right, so open source technologies that make it easy for them to make a data catalog, and they're bag borrowing and stealing whatever they can from the bigger cities. whenever we get the chief data job description up, we should put that online and the city can take that. you can see cities sharing resources so that way even if they don't have the resources themselves, they can work together and pool those resources. >> maybe just to add one more thing to that, when we passed our legislation in 2009, we actually documented and shared our best practices for how we laid forth this program for other cities to use as well. >> great. so, i think we've actually already gone significantly over what i was hoping. i was hoping to [speaker not understood] also. we're going to wrap it up. thanks to all our panelists and the hatchery for hosting us. anything else you need to say before we wrap up? okay, wrap up. (applause)
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>> >> oh. >> if anyone would like to support the federal open data movement please follow us at twitter project open data all one word, or check us out on data.gov. (applause) >> thanks.
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welcome, shall, to the uss macon islands. my name is lewis loeven and i'm the executive director of the san francisco fleet week association and what a great fleet week we're going to have for 2012. thank you. this is the second time we've had the uss macon islands and i want to thank captain pringle and his entire crew. what a great ship and what a great crew. they turned this swear hanger deck around all right night and turned it into a conference room and it looks absolutely beautiful. thank you, captain, and your entire crew. i'm going to make this short because we're already running a little bit behind schedule, but san francisco fleet week for the third year is organized with i object credible
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participation from city, civilian agencies from all around the region and all of us our fabulous united states military, the coast guard has been fabulous in providing assets to protect everybody out on the bay. it is one heck of a logistics program to get this whole program started and here we are the culmination of nearly a year of planning. we've had exercises, we've had lots of meetings down in san francisco up at the marines memorial, this is a fabulous program, we had a great medical exchange yesterday. senior leaders seminar third year in a row has gotten a lot of attention. we have a lot of new people who haven't been here for the past couple years, we have a lot of people who have been here for the last 3 years, and one of the major consistent people who has been behind this whole program is the chairman of the san francisco fleet week association, general -- major general mike myers who i'm
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going to ask to come up and make is remarks. >> thank you, lewis. when i accepted the responsibilities for organizing san francisco's fleet week, the guidance given to me by our honorary co-chair was bring the fleet back to fleet week and make it productive with a mission. lewis has played a big part. i would like to introduce the third fleet commander, this is his ship, we're grateful to be on the ship and had the third fleet with us, please help me welcome vice admiral gerald beeman. >> good morning, everybody, thank you so very much for joining us. i know some of you thought i was the warm up band for the rock stars that are
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going to be here lately. but honestly it's a great honor to be able to host the third seminar. i would like to thank the san francisco fleet week association for helping put this together and grow this into the nation's largest emergency planning event. i don't know how many of you know it, but as a result of the success that we have had here developing partnerships, folks from this association and the conglomeration of people that take part have been called upon not only other places in the united states, but in fact we have at least one example where around the world they called upon a person from here to help share what we've learned as a group. this next two days, it's not just about the panels. the most important part i think for all of us that we've discovered is the personal relationships, looking each other in the eye,
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the ability to shake a hand and look each other in the eye and say we are in this together. it's a wonderful opportunity for each and every one of us to understand the capabilities and limitations that we each bring but i think most importantly for us in the military, it's for you on the civilian side to know it is not uncle sam showing up large and in charge, but rather uncle sam showing up with a multitude of capabilities in a supporting role in hopes that we never have to ememploy it, but better to be prepared like we are than not to be. it's a wonderful opportunity. i encourage each and every one of you to ask questions, take advantage of the opportunity that is so important so if the bell does sound we know who we'll call and who we're going to be working with. thank you
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so much. >> folks, i have two more speakers to welcome you all and the last one will be the mayor of our great city, but before i bring him up, i wanted our senior military in the bay area to say a few remarks because the us coast guard provides and enables the safety conditions for us to be able to have fleet week. it's such an important part of fleet week, what the coast guard provides, so i'd like to bring up to the lecturn here vice admiral -- we call him admiral z because i have a hard time pronouncing his name, but he is now the commander of all the coast guard in the pacific, so admiral z >> mike, thank you very much and good morning, everybody. just to follow on admiral
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beeman's remarks, this is really all about building partnerships. and i'll go back to when i was the federal on scene coordinator for the deep water horizon oil spill with 50,000 responders, many of them military, but also faith-based. we had 35 federally recognized tribes, we had perish presidents that all have an equal voice and when you have any response this is also reality tv reality tv will try to triangulate against the first responders so it's critical you have that partnership built up front and going forward, recognizing any plan we come up with probably will not survive the first shot in any campaign. but the partnerships must endure because unity of effort and unity of command are critical in anything that we do. what better way to showcase what our united states navy and our marine corps, our sea-going
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services, bring to the table in an emergency response, but recognize that they also have another mission to do, macon island just came off a 7-month deployment, this is an era when we're pivoting to the pacific. the ring of fire is also in the pacific. over 35,000 on average fatalities a year over 35 billion dollars worth of damage and we see that year in and year out with tsunamis of catastrophic proportions. today the coast guard is dealing with the debris from that tsunami as it comes ashore here in the state waters as well. just it close on admire beeman's remarks, i think it's critical not just the work here at seminar but over a cup of coffee exchanging business cards because at the end of the day it's the partnerships that mufrt endure at time of crisis. thank you to the macon island
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for this show of force during this third fleet week. >> i'd like to bring up the mayor of the great city and county of san francisco. what a difference he's made as the mayor of san francisco. he certainly has welcomed fleet week, he's welcomed the fleet and marines and mayor lee, we can't thank you enough for your support for everything we're trying to do. please help me welcome mayor ed lee. >> thank you, general myat. good morning, everybody, welcome to the uss macon island. it's my pleasure to be here with you this morning on the green ship of our u.s. navy. it's very appropriate that it be here heading the fleet in san francisco. admiral beeman, thank you very much for your leadership. it
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is impressive what we are accomplishing. just two years ago, we started with an understanding that our military, the coast guard, the u.s. navy, the marine corps, had something that we really needed. it's called logistics expertise. and we recognized that and with the help of our fleet week association, with the help of our honorary chair, former secretary of state george scholtz, along with senator feinstein who started fleet week, we began to appreciate in addition to appreciating the men and women in uniform and the wonderful attributes of having fleet week and the blue angels and the parade of ships, we could also be working on something very important to this city. all across the world there are
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examples after example and i know the men and women and leadership of the uss macon know this after their tour of duty these past months, all over the world there are disasters and emergencies that we are responding to and that you have become the humanitarian assistance and the disaster relief that is absolutely needed. why not practice that here? and so two years ago we gathered with our own departments from the port of san francisco to our sheriff to our police and fire, led by our emergency management division, getting all of our departments from public works to our mta and others together to understand what our roles were and to begin something that i think other cities are beginning to understand are invaluable, creating the relationships, doing the table top exercises and then taking that further step of progress that we've done that i saw
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personally yesterday is going from table top exercises, going from green our counterparts and all the different ranks and understanding their roles to actually practicing what we do. and i can't think of a department more than our public health department who has the best trauma center in the bay area in san francisco through our general hospital to then be with me yesterday and understand how an emergency surgical pop-up tent can be created in less than one hour on the beach of san francisco. and to know and to look these people in the eye, the people from the u.s. navy that put up these tents and set up the gurnies and understand they can treat 50 people at a time, 20 percent in absolutely critical condition, and have a 99
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percent recovery rate for everyone who goes through that, no matter what their wounds might be. this is what we practice, this is what i gained from the exercise yesterday and of course i join the core russ of people who saw the amphibious hover deliver its ability on the beach to look at the clock and see how fast it did, to see the unveiling of those logistics on hand with the people involved. these are the practices now as our public wants it know more and more what are we doing to prepare beyond the table top exercises? we are practicing these very vital practices, these things that will really help save lives, creating more relationships, bringing in more partners. we have all the city agencies that are here today. we're also bringing in other agencies whether it's caltrans or national park service, that would be part of this. whether
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it's other federal government entities that we work with, of course our local coast guard, people who are here every day that need to build these relationships because we are not going to fail our public. too many examples across the world where they known disasters were in front of them and they did not prepare. and this is our opportunity and i am very thankful to our fleet week association for bringing this forward to the u.s. navy for being here to our marine corps and our coast guard, they are all working together to make sure that we can practice what we preach. the most, i think, beautiful thing of fleet week now is not only the appreciation but right down to the neighborhood leaders in our neighborhoods in san francisco, they can have a feeling of confidence that the city is ready. so i want to again k